With multiple rounds of showers and possible thunderstorms expected this weekend, HSHS St. Elizabeth’s Hospital has postponed the planned parking lot resurfacing project that was scheduled to begin today, July 9 at 5 p.m. and run through Monday, July 12. 

All entrances and parking lots on the hospital campus will be open and available to patients and visitors. 

Weather permitting, work will start the following weekend of July l6-19, which will affect access and traffic flow in various areas of the campus. Cones, barricades and signs will be posted to further direct patients and visitors during future phases of work. Appropriate emergency, transportation, city and county entities have also been properly notified for each phase of work and informed of alternate route and access points. 

The public is also reminded that the main lobby doors into the hospital remain closed to visitors and patients. Anyone in need of emergent health care should go immediately to the emergency department (ED), located nearest to the Regency Park entrance. All visitors and outpatients should enter the hospital at the “Outpatient” sign/entrance to have a temperature check and be screened for COVID-19 symptoms. Visiting hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Patients with appointments in any of the physician offices in the O’Fallon Health Center can enter at the “Health Center” sign and proceed directly to their appointment. Screening will occur at the individual offices.   
Masks are still mandatory in all health care settings, per current CDC guidelines.

Media Contact

Kelly Barbeau

Manager, Marketing & Communications
HSHS Illinois
Office: (618) 234-2120, Ext. 41270
kelly.barbeau@hshs.org

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