(BREESE, IL) – The HSHS St. Joseph’s Hospital diabetes self-management education program in Breese has been awarded continued Recognition from the American Diabetes Association. The program was originally recognized in 2007. This program offers high quality education services to the patients it serves.
 
The ADA Education Recognition effort, begun in the fall of 1986, is a voluntary process which assures that approved education programs have met the National Standards of Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs. Programs that achieved Recognition status have a staff of knowledge health professionals who can provide state-of-the-art information about diabetes management for participants.
 
Self-management education is an essential component of diabetes treatment. One consequence of compliance with the National Standards is the greater consistency in the quality and quantity of education offered to people with diabetes. The participant in an ADA Recognized program will be taught, as needed, self-care skills that will promote better management of his or her diabetes treatment regimen. All approved education programs cover the following topics as needed: diabetes disease process; nutritional management; physical activity; medications; monitoring; preventing, detecting, and treating acute complications; preventing, detecting, and treating chronic complications through risk deduction; goal setting and problem solving; psychological adjustment; and preconception care, management during pregnancy, and gestational management.
 
Assuring high-quality education for patient self-care is one the primary goals of the Education Recognition program. Through the support of the health care team and increased knowledge and awareness of diabetes, the patient can assume a major part of the responsibility for his/her diabetes management. Unnecessary hospital admissions and some of the acute and chronic complication of diabetes may be prevented through self-management education.
 
According to the American Diabetes Association, there are 29.1 million people or 9.3% of the population in the United States who have diabetes. While an estimated 21 million have been diagnosed, unfortunately, 8.1 million people are not aware that they have this disease. Each day more than 3,900 people are diagnosed with diabetes. Many will first learn they have diabetes when they are treated for one of its life-threating complications – heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and nerve disease and amputation. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years or older in 2014 in the US. Diabetes contributed to 234,051 deaths in 2010, making it the seventh leading cause of death in the US. Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is 50% greater than that of people of similar age but without diabetes.
 
For more information about the Diabetes Education Program, call 618-526-5743.

Media Contact

Ashley Gramann

Manager, Communications
HSHS Illinois
Office: (618) 526-5439
Cell: (618) 651-2588
ashley.gramann@hshs.org

Latest News

Trick or Treat Alternatives and Safety Tips

 October 20, 2020

Consider more treats and less tricks this Halloween.

 

Foundation supports hospital with over $330,000 donation

 October 16, 2020

HSHS St. Joseph's Foundation to support funding of six hospital projects

 

Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month

 October 16, 2020

This awareness month hopes to bring these struggles to light so families know they are not alone.