(BREESE, IL) — HSHS St. Joseph’s Hospital Breese is partnering with Hoyleton Youth & Family Services to offer a Mental Health First Aid seminar on Saturday, February 15 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. This free seminar will be hosted in the hospital’s Heritage Room.
 
Mental Health First Aid provides education on how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. This eight-hour training teaches skills needed to reach out and provide initial support to someone who may be experiencing a mental health crisis or substance use problem. Additionally, this course will help train individuals on how to connect those in need to appropriate care.  Training on administering naloxone in the event of an opioid overdose will also be provided. 
 
All members of the community are invited to attend this free event. A medical background or training is not needed.  Those who complete the class will receive a free book and their certification in Mental Health First Aid. Additionally, Continuing Education Units are available upon request for LSW, LCSW, LPC and LCPC. Lunch will also be provided.
 
“We are pleased to offer this learning opportunity for our community,” said Barb Strieker, community benefits facilitator. “Similar to assisting someone with a physical illness or disease,  this first aid course will provide information on how to assist someone with a mental health need in a crisis and non-crisis situation. 
 
To register for this event, visit surveymonkey.com/r/LV5Q2L7. For more information, contact instructor Allison Hoshide at 618-688-4776 or by emailing ahoshide@hoyleton.org.

Media Contact

Ashley Gramann

Manager, Communications
HSHS Illinois
Office: (618) 526-5439
ashley.gramann@hshs.org

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